The Church & The Dragon

The history and folklore of one of the most beautiful churches in Essex, England – Broomfield Parish Church… near Chelmsford.

Why did the Normans build the church on Broomfield Green?
Well, it’s all to do with a very sneaky dragon 🐉 that lived in an adjacent field. One of His footprints can still be seen today 😊

The film covers a couple of forgotten parish stories too, including the baby found on the roadside in 1704 and a little about my family connection to this beautiful church.


The parish church of St. Mary the Virgin, anciently known as St. Leonard stands prominent in the centre of the village of Broomfield near. Chelmsford, Essex.
When the original Norman church was built in the late 11th century, Possibly around the time of the Domesday Book of 1086, the village was known as Brumfelda”, “Brumfeld” or “Brunfelle”, respectively.
The church was probably built on the site of an old wooden Saxon church which existed before the conquest,
Before the Normans invaded, Broomfield was owned by a Saxon lord named Saewulf – his name appears as Lord of 30 other holdings before 1066 around England and as far away as Cornwall.
He lost his Broomfield holding after the Normans invaded, but may not have fallen entirely from favour as his name still appears as landowner of 7 places from 1086 onwards, these landholdings were held directly from the crown and so he was answerable to King William I.
In telling the history of the church as we know today, I am going to begin its humble beginnings from 1086.

Full Documentary Below

The History and Folklore of Broomfield Parish, Essex, England

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s