Sir Osmer Bostock – Saxon Thane of Botestock & Shipbrook

Sir Osmer Bostock was born more then 1000 years ago, he was a Saxon thane or (Lord), he fought against the invading Normans and is believed to have died in the year 1066. He is my 31x great grandfather and ancestor to millions more, he is a part of our Anglo Saxon Heritage and if your origins are English he is probably a part of your family history too.

Origin of the name:

The name Bostock or (Botestock / Bostwick) is of Saxon origin and is traceable to the time of Edward the Confessor, who preceeded Harold, the last of the Saxon Kings, upon the throne of England, the name was derived from the manor of the same name, situated on the River Dan in Cheshire.
Botestock is compounded of two Saxon words : Bote, (latin compensatio) , is a term used in old English law signifying ‘recompende’, compensation, satisfaction or amends; hence, in the old Saxon law, when the punishment of all crimes was reduced to a money valuation, manbote was a compensation or equivalent for a man slain. Ploughbote was the right which a tenant possessed of taking from the forest sufficient to mend his plough when broken, that is, enough to recompense him for the loss suffered. Stock, Saxon ‘ ‘stoc’, is equivalent to the Latin “stirps” or “truncus”, a root or trunk. Hence figuratively speaking, a race or family, and finally, origin or place from which a family or race sprung.
Botestock, therefore, means a place given in compensation or as a recompense for some thing.

Anglo Saxon Long Hall Yeavering - an important archeological site in Britain - includes an Anglo-Saxon palace as well as a great hall.  It was built, in modern times, based on the Hope-Taylor excavation report.   Anglo-Saxon lords would live in such a palace (which was located close to his great hall). Source: Awesome Stories

Anglo Saxon Long Hall
Yeavering – an important archeological site in Britain – includes an Anglo-Saxon palace as well as a great hall. It was built, in modern times, based on the Hope-Taylor excavation report.
Anglo-Saxon lords would live in such a palace (which was located close to his great hall).
Source: Awesome Stories

Sir Osmer Bostock:

The earliest member of the Bostock family, Sir Osmer Bostock, who before 1066 held the manor of Bostock and from this small holding his family surname derived. Osmer held severel manor’s before 1066.

Claverton, Ati’s Cross, Cheshire
Bostock, Middlewich, Cheshire
Davenham, Middlewich, Cheshire
Leftwich, Middlewich, Cheshire
Shipbrook, Middlewich, Cheshire
Audlem, Warmundestrou, Cheshire
Austerson, Warmundestrou, Cheshire
Crewe, Warmundestrou, Cheshire
Frith, Warmundestrou, Cheshire
Wisterson, Warmundestrou, Cheshire

Osmer was also known as Osmer of Shipbrook, so I would presume that the manor’s of Shipbrook and Bostock were particularly important to him. Little is known about this ancient Saxon Thane, who at the time of the Norman invasion would have likely fought against the invading army, The Visitations of Cheshire record his details as follows:

‘Sr Osmer [Oliver] de Bostock an’o 1066’

Many family trees have reached the conclusion that an’o 1066 (event 1066) is a clear indication that his death occurred during the Battle of Hastings. Which is certainly a big possibility, however it’s a conclusion that we can’t prove as only about 25 people are actually remembered and recorded as being at the battle. Although there were obviously many more.
At the time of the conquest of England Osmer was Lord of Bostock, Shipbrooke, Davenham, Audlem, Claverton, Crewe, a part of Edlaston, a part of Wybunbury-cum-Frith, a part of Leftwich, a part of Wistaston, he had two hedged enclosures for deer, an eyrie for hawks, houses in Chester, and a salt pit in Northwich, all in Cheshire. (Most of these lands were granted after the conquest to Richard de Vernon, Baron of Shipbrook, as recorded in the Doomsday Book. for his services to William the Conquer)”
For the next 100 years The Bostocks held arms under the Vernon family.
“It is probable that after confiscation of his lands Osmer Botestoch family were allowed to live in the manor of Bostock, one of his smaller manors, and either allowed to retain it, or hold it doing feudal service to the Vernons in the 12th Century.”

Bostock Coat of Arms:

Arms : Sable ; a fesse humettee, argent.

Crest : On the stump of a tree, eradicated, argent ; a bear’s head,, erased, sable, muzzled, or.

Motto: Semper Presto Servire. “Always ready to serve.”

The field, shield or escutcheon is black (sable). In Bary’s “Plates of Coat Armour” the “Bostock Arms” are given with two different shields, but the shape is not material.

A “fesse”, (French fasce), is one of the nine ordinaries of Heraldry, and is formed by two horizontal lines drawn across the field, and, according to the opinion of most writers, should contain one-third part of the escutcheon.

The fesse is supposed to represent the military belt ; by some termed the “Cingulam Honoris”, or “girdle of honor”.

A “fesse humet” or “humettee”, is a fesse whose ends do not reach to the side extremities of the escutcheon, but a “fesse humettee” should also show the thickness.

Bostock Coat of Arms

Bostock Coat of Arms

Family Connection:

Sir Osmer “Saxon Lord of Botestock” de BOSTOCK (1010 – 1066)
31x great-grandfather

Hugh de BOSTOCK (1058 – 1112)
son of Sir Osmer “Saxon Lord of Botestock” de BOSTOCK

Richard de BOSTOCK (1075 – )
son of Hugh de BOSTOCK

Roger de BOSTOCK (1105 – 1166)
son of Richard de BOSTOCK

Gilbert de BOSTOCK (1130 – 1194)
son of Roger de BOSTOCK

Randulph ‘Ralph’ de BOSTOCK (1155 – 1222)
son of Gilbert de BOSTOCK

Sir Warren ‘of Henbury’ de BOSTOCK (1180 – 1206)
son of Randulph ‘Ralph’ de BOSTOCK

Sir Henry ‘of Henbury’ de BOSTOCK (1205 – )
son of Sir Warren ‘of Henbury’ de BOSTOCK (1180 – 1206)

Sir William BOSTOCK (1225 – 1309)
son of Sir Henry ‘of Henbury’ de BOSTOCK

Sir Edward BOSTOCK (1243 – 1298)
son of Sir William BOSTOCK

Sir Adam BOSTOCK (1270 – 1338)
son of Sir Edward BOSTOCK

Sir William BOSTOCK (1310 – 1372)
son of Sir Adam BOSTOCK

Rafe ‘of Moulton’ BOSTOCK (1355 – )
son of Sir William BOSTOCK

David ‘of Moulton’ BOSTOCK (1390 – )
son of Rafe ‘of Moulton’ BOSTOCK

Raph ‘of Moulton’ BOSTOCK (1420 – )
son of David ‘of Moulton’ BOSTOCK

Thomas ‘of Moulton’ BOSTOCK (1450 – )
son of Raph ‘of Moulton’ BOSTOCK

Raphe ‘of Moulton’ BOSTOCK (1480 – )
son of Thomas ‘of Moulton’ BOSTOCK

Robert ‘of Moulton’ BOSTOCK (1510 – )
son of Raphe ‘of Moulton’ BOSTOCK

Raph ‘of Moulton’ BOSTOCK (1530 – 1595)
son of Robert ‘of Moulton’ BOSTOCK

William ‘of Mottram & Davenham’ BOSTOCK (1572 – )
son of Raph ‘of Moulton’ BOSTOCK

Ellen BOSTOCK (1610 – )
daughter of William ‘of Mottram & Davenham’ BOSTOCK

Jane ATHERTON (1632 – )
daughter of Ellen BOSTOCK

Margaret BRENT (1657 – )
daughter of Jane ATHERTON

Peter BOWYER (1691 – 1794)
son of Margaret BRENT

Peter BOWER (1715 – 1795)
son of Peter BOWYER

Mary BOWER (1739 – 1827)
daughter of Peter BOWER

Reuben PLASKETT (1775 – 1854)
son of Mary BOWER

William PLASKETT (1820 – 1912)
son of Reuben PLASKETT

William Reubon PLASKETT (1844 – 1918)
son of William PLASKETT

Edmund Lionel PLASKETT (1881 – 1952)
son of William Reubon PLASKETT

Edmund Samuel PLASKETT (1906 – 1977)
son of Edmund Lionel PLASKETT

Joyce Margery PLASKETT (1934 – 2013)
daughter of Edmund Samuel PLASKETT

Christine Angela Deborah BEAN (1957 – )
daughter of Joyce Margery PLASKETT

Stephen Robert KUTA
the son of Christine Angela Deborah BEAN

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One thought on “Sir Osmer Bostock – Saxon Thane of Botestock & Shipbrook

  1. My grandmother was a Bostwick . Daughter if Ira Bostwick I have traced the family back to Osmer Bostock and down to Arthur Bostwick who married Jane Whittel in Tarpoley, England

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