Generation Eleven – John ‘alias Galliver’ DRAPER (1620 – after 1658)

47 Generations of Family History
Generation Eleven
John Draper
Alias; John Galliver
Gentleman & Royalist Cavalier
(1620 – after 1658)

Facts

Name: John ‘alias Galliver’ DRAPER
Birth: 1620
Place of Birth: Haselbury Plucknett, Somerset, England
Parents:
Father: Richard ‘of Haselbury & Crewkerne’ DRAPER
Mother: Elinor Minterne

Spouse: Elizabeth Collins
Marriage: 4th February 1644
Place of Marriage: Exton, Somerset, England

Children: They had 2 known child.
i. John ‘alias Garliford’ DRAPER Gent
ii. Henry ‘alias Galliford’ DRAPER

Death: after 1658
Place of Death: Possibly; Haselbury Plucknett, Dorset, England.
Cause of Death: Unknown
Burial: Unknown
Place of Burial: Possibly; St Michael, Haselbury Plucknett, Dorset, England

Heraldry: None Identified

Relationship to me: 10th Great Grandfather

Short Biography

John ‘alias Galliver’ DRAPER [1, 2, 3]. Was born abt 1620 in Haselbury Plucknett,
Somerset, England. He was the son of Richard Draper of Haselbury & Crewkerne (1598 – 1658) and Elinor Minterne (1600 – 1631).
John was one of two siblings, and may have been the youngest the exact dates for their births are unknown but there are some good primary sources to suggest that they were both born c. 1620 – 1625. Both John and his sister Elizabeth inherited £4 to be divided equally from their grandfather John Minterne of Batcombe (1557 – 1631).
The following extract is recorded in his probate; (I give and bequeath unto Elizabeth Draper and John Drap[er] her brother fower pound equally to bee devided betweene) [2]..
Because Elizabeth’s name is mentioned first I would presume she is the eldest, there is no mention in this document of their mother Elinor although her siblings are all mentioned. So I would guess she had died before this last will and testament was written, so her death was before 1631 and perhaps even as early as 1625. She may have died in her early twenty’s as a result of childbirth. Her name and marriage to Richard Draper is recorded in the Visitations of Dorset, 1623. So she was probably still alive at the time.

There is no evidence to suggest that John’s widowed father Richard Draper ever re-married, although he would have made a good husband as he was wealthy and inherited land and property passed down to him through his father John Draper (1550 – 1615). His wealth though caused problems and a lot of cases were made against him from in-laws connected through his sister’s marriages in regards to the land he inherited.
John Draper was born at least twenty years before the English Civil when James I was still King of England. At the time of his birth Witch hunts, religion and the bubonic plague were a very real issue. The first outbreak of plague he would have experienced was in 1625 whilst he was still a small child.
It’s hard to imagine what childhood was like during this time, although John Draper was born into a privileged family with great connections through both his mother and father, so I can’t imagine a childhood of hardship and it’s very likely he received a good but very strict education. John and his sister Elizabeth most likely had their own resident tutor.

I haven’t identified where their main residence was, the family held property in both Haselbury and Crewkerne although later generations lived at North Down so it’s very likely this is where the family lived.

By 1625 King James I had died and the throne passed to his son and heir Charles I, It was hoped that this new King was as popular as his father was, and although King James had flaws he was very much mourned. Over the next twenty years problems of taxation and religion arose. The first involved King Charles I’s attempts to impose taxation without the consent of Parliament; the second, the efforts to impose changes in the forms of worship within the Anglican Church. To carry out his policy the king was dependent on the collaboration of landowners in the counties, who served the Crown in turn as unpaid lord-lieutenant, deputy lieutenant, sheriff and justice of the peace. The breakdown of this collaboration within the county administration, and the resistance in Parliament to the king’s demands, led finally to war. Yet this was what most people wished to avoid, and many remained as neutral and as uncommitted as they possibly could.

Somerset had resisted the king’s demands for Ship money in 1634 when the county was asked to pay £8990, towards which Taunton was to contribute £100, Bath and Bridgwater £70 each, Minehead and Wells £60 each, Axbridge £30, Ilchester, Langport and Yeovil £20 each. Resistance came from the towns and from some country gentlemen. Petitions were sent to Parliament and the sheriff found difficulty in collecting the money. In 1636 he had to report a deficit of £1425. In 1640, even after a reduced demand, only £300 had been collected by September, an indication of the growing opposition to the king. In religious affairs, too, the example of the churchwardens of Beckington demonstrated the strong Puritan feeling in the county against Archbishop Laud’s attempts to restore Anglican ceremonial. They refused to move the communion table ‘altarwise’. Yet, in spite of all this, when the war began in 1642, the county on the whole appeared to be Royalist. Most of the landowners and country gentlemen together with most of the country people living on their estates, were for the king. It was in the towns, Bath, Bridgwater, Frome, Minehead and Taunton, that the traders and the workers in the woollen cloth industry were for the most part strongly Puritan and supported Parliament.

The English Civil War in Somerset

The English Civil War in Somerset

By 22 August 1642 England had become a very different place to live and the English Civil war had broken out. The country was divided Parliamentarians against Royalists.

The Draper family certainly supported the Royalist cause, and their involvement wasn’t secret. This is most likely the reason for the family using the alias of Garliford or Galliver. It first appears on the 4th February 1644 on the marriage document of John Draper and his wife Elizabeth Collins who were married in Exton, Somerset two years after war broke out.

How much involvement the family had during the Civil War is unknown, but King Charles called upon the gentry of Somerset who supported him to provide men and arms for his war. On the 10th July 1645 in the County of Somerset blood was spilled during the Battle of Langport. Was John Draper and his father Richard Draper present at this battle, I’m not sure. If they were not then they probably supported in some other way, lodgings, horses, weapons and perhaps even men.

Although there were three phases of the English Civil War, It did not end until the 3rd September 1651, but the tables were already turning a few years before that, and shortly after the end of the first phase in 1646 the Parliamentarians had successfully set up county Committee’s for Compounding with Delinquents. Both John Draper and his father Richard Draper were arrested and hauled in front of these courts, the room would have been bias and terrifying, Children, Women and Men were all dragged before the court, often these courts were set up in the homes of the gentry involved.

The oil-on-canvas picture, painted in 1878, depicts a scene in an imaginary Royalist household during the English Civil War. The Parliamentarians have taken over the house and question the son about his Royalist father (the man lounging on a chair in the centre of the scene is identifiable as a Roundhead officer by his military attire and his orange sash). Yeames was inspired to paint the picture to show the crises that could arise from the natural frankness of young children. Here, if the boy tells the truth he will endanger his father, but if he lies he will go against the ideal of honesty undoubtedly instilled in him by his parents. Painted by William Frederick Yeames. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Frederick_Yeames

The oil-on-canvas picture, painted in 1878, depicts a scene in an imaginary Royalist household during the English Civil War. The Parliamentarians have taken over the house and question the son about his Royalist father (the man lounging on a chair in the centre of the scene is identifiable as a Roundhead officer by his military attire and his orange sash). Yeames was inspired to paint the picture to show the crises that could arise from the natural frankness of young children. Here, if the boy tells the truth he will endanger his father, but if he lies he will go against the ideal of honesty undoubtedly instilled in him by his parents.
Painted by William Frederick Yeames.
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Frederick_Yeames

Committee for Compounding with Delinquents

In 1643, near the start of the English Civil War, Parliament set up two committees the Sequestration Committee which confiscated the estates of the Royalists who fought against Parliament, and the Committee for Compounding with Delinquents which allowed Royalists whose estates had been sequestrated, to compound for their estates — pay a fine and recover their estates — if they pledged not to take up arms against Parliament again. The size of the fine they had to pay depended on the worth of the estate and how great their support for the Royalist cause had been.
To administer the process of sequestration, a sequestration committee was established in each county. If a local committee sequestrated an estate they usually let it to a tenant and the income was used “to the best advantage of the State”. If a “delinquent” wished to recover his estate he had to apply to the Committee for Compounding with Delinquents based in London, as the national Sequestration Committee was absorbed by the Committee for Compounding in 1644.
After the Restoration of the monarchy in 1660, most of the sequestrated land was returned to the pre-war owners.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Committee_for_Compounding_with_Delinquents

The case against Richard and his son John Draper was mild compared to some; they may even have been trumped-up in order to pull known Royalists into court.

The Case against Richard and John Draper [3]

15th May 1647
Certificate from the County Committee about Rich. Draper, and his takings the Oath and Covenant Presented to the Committee for compounding I July 1647

28th February 1648
Richard Draper compounds for delinquency. Called Robert Fitchett a round-headed rogue, and caused him to be fined and imprisoned by the King’s party.

8th March 1648
Fine at 1/10. 113/

19th June 1648
John Draper petitions to compound for lands discovered by him to be entailed on him, Was in the King’s quarters for two months.

7th July 1648
Fine at 1/6. 72/

25th November 1653. Richard Draper begs acceptance of the remainder of his fine, his son having paid 72/ for part of the petitioners estate, yet the County Committee threaten to sequester him for his whole fine.

22nd March 1654.
The father to pay 46/ with interest.

24th March 1654
Paid and estate discharged.

In total Richard Draper spent 7 years in prison and his son John 2 months.
Which prison they were held is not currently known, but they would have had to pay for the privilege of being there and life would have been bleak.

The last record we see John Draper appear in is the Indenture of Release of property in Crewkerne, Somerset, dated 4th October 1658. DD\BK/5/15 [1].

Both John and his wife Elizabeth Draper had two children, the date of John Draper’s death is unknown.

Elizabeth COLLINS. She was born Abt. 1620 in Somerset, England.

John ‘alias Galliver’ DRAPER and Elizabeth COLLINS. They were married on 04 Feb 1644 in
Exton, Somerset, England. They had 2 children.

  • i. John ‘alias Garliford’ DRAPER Gent [4, 5]. He was born Abt. 1650 in
    Haselbury Plucknett, Somerset, England. He married Joane COOKSLEY.
    They were married on 13 Nov 1671 in Exton, Somerset, England [5].
    Residence 1699 in North Down, Haselbury Plucknett, Somerset, England [4].
    He died Abt. Jun 1699 in Haselbury Plucknett, Somerset, England [4]. Burial on
    15 Jun 1699 in St Michael, Haselbury Plucknett, Dorset, England [4].
  • ii. Henry ‘alias Galliford’ DRAPER. He was born Abt. 1654 in Haselbury
    Plucknett, Somerset, England. He married Susanna HAWTEN. They were
    married on 28 Apr 1674 in Exton, Somerset, England.

John Draper Pedigree

Pedigree of John Draper. The following Pedigree showcases John Draper's interesting family history. Both the Maye family and Malet have origins spanning centuries into the past. The Wolley and Bucker family were present at the courts of King Henry VIII and Queen Elizabeth I.

Pedigree of John Draper.
The following Pedigree showcases John Draper’s interesting family history.
Both the Maye family and Malet have origins spanning centuries into the past. The Wolley and Bucker family were present at the courts of King Henry VIII and Queen Elizabeth I.

Sources

[1] British History online, CREWKERNE (British History online), Indenture of Release DD\BK/5/15
1658, Oct. 4. Indenture of Release DD\BK/5/15 1658, Oct. 4These documents are held at
Somerset Archive and Record Service1 doc.Contents: John Draper of West Lydford, gent.,
and Catheryne his wife, Thos. Younge of Manston, Dorset, gent., and Robt. Browne of
Chiltorne (for £233 paid him by Thos. Palmer of Crewkerne, yeoman) to John Hutchins of
Hewysh, gent., and Wm. Hodges of Crewkerne, gent., OF mess., watergrist mill, water ponds,
mill streames, water-courses belonging to the watergrist mill; dwellinghouses with little plot of
ground adjoining; 3a. arable in the North Feild of Crewkerne, near adjoining the mess. and mill
in the South; common of pasture for two beasts lease in the Common feilds of Crewkerne; 7a.
of arable in the North common feilds in Crewkerne in Crow Castle; 1a. of arable in 3 plots near
the watergrist mill; 1a. of meadow in Tayle Mill Mead, Crewkerne; barn called Tann Howse;
close or parcel of meadow called Mange Meade (6a.); 2a. of arable in the Common feilds of
Crewkerne at brodhord [?]; 1a. of new arable land lately meadow in the Northeast comon feilds
of Crewkerne at Sedgwell; close pasture lately divided into 3 closes called Reymes or
Ryhames, Crewkerne ph; – 11a. in all: Houses and outhouses adjoining under the “ruffe” of the
last mentioned dwelling house in Crewkerne near the said watergrist mill; backside belonging
called the beach (½a.) between the said mess. behind the mill pond and part of the Northfeild
of Crewkerne; common of pasture for 60 sheep in the Commonfeildes do.; Common of pasture
for 1 horse beast and 2 “roder” beasts in do. – all in the tenure of Thos. Palmer and all other his
lands and heredits. in Crewkerne held by lease from John Draper, Ric. D. his father, deced.,
and Elizabeth Draper, daughter of Ric; Another dwellinghouse newly built with barn and little
plot of ground adjoining and garden plot in the South side of the said house (½ yd.) in
Crewkerne late in the tenure of Samuell Sanders or harper and now of Anthony Chedd, tanner;
and 6a. of arable in the Comonfeildes of Crewkerne – (at Blackemixon (3a.); Craselane head
(1a.); 2a. at langden in the Southfeild, one called Quare acre and the other on the East side of
the way from Crewkerne to Henlie); common of pasture for 2 “Roder” and 1 horse beast in the
commonfeilds of Crewkerne; Part of one other dwellinghouse late in the tenure of John
Farnham or Fowler in Crewkerne, near the said mill and as much ground adjoining as lies flat
square from the South end of the house to the barn and garden plot adjoining the mill garden
and the ground behind the barn from the mill weir Southward, formerly in the tenure of Thos.
Marshell; 3a. of arable in the commonfeildes (1a. at Langdon, 1a. at blackemison and 1a. at
Rouckham in the North commonfeildes); – all in Crewkerne in the tenure of Robt. Farnham or
Fowler. Parchment, 2 skins. Seal tag cut off close to fold, seal missing.

[2] Ancestry.com, England & Wales, Prerogative Court of Canterbury Wills, 1384-1858
(Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.), The last Will and testament of John Mynterne of Batcombe. I
give and bequeath unto Elizabeth Draper and John Drap[er] her brother fower pound equally to
bee devided betweene.

[3] Richd. Draper, and John, his Son, Haselbury Plucknett, Somerset.see image for more details.

[4] Free REG – Burials – Haselbury Plucknett, Somerset, England (http://www.freereg.org.uk/),
Burial of John Draper – 15 June 1699 – Haselbury Plucknett. Abode; North Down Notes; Gent.

[5] Transcriptions © Somerset & Dorset Family History Society, Somerset Marriages (pre-1754)
Transcription (Somerset & Dorset Family History Society), Marriage of John Draper and
Joanna Coosley – Exton – 1671. see image for more details.

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3 thoughts on “Generation Eleven – John ‘alias Galliver’ DRAPER (1620 – after 1658)

    • That’s very true, although it might be because the money came from a grandparent and they inherited what their would have received if she had survived. Their mothers siblings inherited very different amounts.

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