The last Will and Testament of Henry Minterne, Rector of Chedington – 1723

Wills, Administrations and Inventories
of The Mintern Family
of Hook, Chedington and Batcombe, Dorset

The last Will and Testament of Henry Minterne, Rector of Chedington – 1723

Below is a transcription of a Will belonging to Henry Minterne who was ordained ‘Rector of Cheddington’, this Will is dated 1723 and Henry is my 9x great grandfather.
There are about twenty words I am having trouble to decipher in this document, and I will update this post as and when I am able to work out the missing words. (any help would be much appreciated)

Name: Henry Minterne
Residence Date: 1723
Residence Place: Cheddington, Dorset
Event Type: Will
Probate Court: Bristol Consistitory
Reference Number: Bc/Ew
Event Record Number: 33; 34

In the Name of God Amen, I Henry Minterne of Cheddington in the county of Dorset, Clerk knowing the uncertainty of this life and being willing to settle and dispose of my affairs in this world before I am removed into another do write and ordaine this my last Will and Testament in manner following (that is to say) First I recommend my soul into the hands of almight God humbly hopeing for the forgiveness of my sins through the meritts of my saviour Jesus Christ and my body I commit to the Earth to be decently interred according to the discretion of my executrix here after named Imprimus I give and bequeath all that farms messuage and tenant with the appurtenances comonly called or known by the name of Pottwell containing by estimation three score acres comon croft of land meadow and pasture situate lyeing and being a little Winsor within the parish of Broadwindsor in the county of Dorset aforesaid which was purchased by me of and from John Pins esq unto my son William Minterne his exstoes admoes and assignes to hold to him my said son William exstoes admoes and assignes for during all the rest residue and remainder of such farms and estate that I have therein yet to —— and unexpired ‘Hen’.
I give and devise to my son Henry Minterne and his heirs for ever all the right and title which I have in and to the Royalty of Cheddington aforesaid with the privileges annuities liberties ———— and casualties to the same belonging or in wife appertaining ‘Hen’.
I give and devise all my lands and tenements which are situate lyeing and being within the said parish of Cheddington aforesaid Unto my son Samuel Minterne so have and to hold the said lands with their and every of their appurtenances unto my said son Samuel his heirs and assigns forever ‘Hen’.
I give unto my daughter Joane the now wife of Thomas Wakelee the same of five pounds sterling to be paid her by my said executrix at the end of one year next after my decease ‘Hen’.
I give unto my said son William Minterne one feather bed tester bedstead with all other things there unto belonging too after standing bedsteads and chest one large coffer five pewter dishes, two brass tray one skillett one small kettle six half hogsheads one little coffer my long table board in the hall in my now dwelling house. one other table board in the milkhouse one warming pan and one large ———- ——— ‘Hen’.
I give unto my five Grandchildren (sons and daughter of my said son William) and to every of them the same of five pounds sterling to be paid unto every one of them by my said executrix at the end of one year next after my decease and their fathers receipt for the said severall guines shall be a sufficient discharge to my said executrix for same ‘Hen’.
all the rest residue and remainder of my personall eastate goods and chattels whatsoever and not herein and hereby by me already given. I give and bequeath unto Mary my loveing wife whence I do hereby make constitute ordain and appoint whole and sole executrix of this my last will and testament —- ——- where of I the said Henry Minterne the elder have bequeath sign my hand and seale this second day of June in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and twenty two.

signed, sealed, published and declared by the said testator for to contain his only last will and testament in the presence of us whose names are hereunder subscribed as witnesses thereunto.

Signed; Henry Minterne

Witnessed and Signed;
William Bartlett
Thomas Wakeley
Roger Colke
James Bagg

21st May 1723
proved by the executrix

(transcribed by Stephen Dawe-Kuta – 15 June 2014)

The Mintern manuscripts is out of copyright, but the compilation, the annotation and the textual, editorial, and introductory matter are the copyright of the editors, whose work should be acknowledged in any quotation or reproduction of this work.

The last Will and Testament of Henry Minterne, Rector of Chedington - 1723

The last Will and Testament of Henry Minterne, Rector of Chedington – 1723 – page one of document

Will of Henry Mintern - 1723 - Cheddington, Dorset, England - page 2

The last Will and Testament of Henry Minterne, Rector of Chedington – 1723 – page two of document

 

Will of Henry Mintern - Rector of Chedington - 1739 - Dorset, England

Will of Henry Mintern – Rector of Chedington – 1739 – Dorset, England

———————————————————————————————————–

An explanation of items listed in this will:

(i) Tester Bedstead
tester, canopy, usually of carved or cloth-draped wood, over a bed, tomb, pulpit, or throne. It dates from the 14th century and is usually made of the same material as the object it covers. It can be supported either by four posts, by two posts at the foot and a headpiece at the back, or by suspension from the ceiling. The edges may overhang and in some cases are decorated with incised work or a fabric valance. The word, derived from the late Latin testa (“head”), came into use in the Middle Ages, originally referring only to the vertical headpiece.

Perhaps the most notable and widespread use of the tester was in bed design. Sixteenth- and 17th-century testers were frequently massive in construction and featured elaborate carving of the canopy over the bed and of its supporting posts. In the 18th century, testers over beds became lighter and more purely decorative, in part because of the development of smaller, more intimate rooms in northern European residences. Popular in 19th-century England, the characteristic full tester bed featured detailed front posts on a vase-turned section resting on block supports.

A mid-17th century, oak, tester, double bed with cupboard

A mid-17th century, oak, tester, double bed with cupboard

(ii) Large Coffer
a strongbox or small chest for holding valuables.

A large Coffer

A large Coffer

(iii) Pewter Dishes
Pewter is a malleable metal alloy, traditionally 85–99% tin, with the remainder consisting of copper, antimony, bismuth and sometimes, less commonly today, lead. Silver is also sometimes used.

Pewter Dish

Pewter Dish

(iv) Skillet
metal cooking pot, with a long handle and sometimes legs, for cooking at a hearth.

skillet pan

skillet pan

(v) Hogshead
A hogshead is a large cask of liquid

(vi) Warming Pan
A bed warmer or warming pan was a common household item in countries with cold winters, especially in Europe. It consisted of a metal container, usually fitted with a handle and shaped somewhat like a modern frying pan, with a solid or finely perforated lid. The pan would be filled with hot coals and placed under the covers of a bed, to warm it up and/or dry it out before use.

Warming Pan

Warming Pan

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