Draft will of Sir Davy [David] Owen, kt – 20 Feb 1529/30

Sir David Owen of Midhurst (1459 – 1535), was the illegitimate son of Sir Owain TUDOR (1400 – 1461) husband of Princess Catherine de Valois (1401 – 1437), Sir David Owen was born at Pembroke Castle. He married an heiress, Mary Bohun (1459 – 1500) and settled in Sussex. He is buried in the priory church of Easebourne, near Midhurst.

Pembroke Castle

Sir Owain TUDOR is father of the TUDOR DYNASTY, He is also my 17th great-grandfather.

Below is a Draft copy of the last will and testament for David Owen (my 16th great-grandfather), the document is well detailed and records names for all his living family, children and some of his grandchildren, including details for land and estate.

His eldest son, Sir Henry Owen of Midhurst (1480 – 1542), is my 15th great-grandfather and mentioned many times throughout the document.

Sir Henry Owen married Dorothy West (1483 – 1542), and had at least three children – Elizabeth Owen (1510 – 1554), David Owen (1512 – ) and Thomas Owen of Midhurst (1515 – ), my 14th great-grandfather.

The Owen family remained prosperous in Sussex until the early 17th century.


Pedigree of the Owen Family / illegitimate birth right – TUDOR


Draft will of Sir Davy [David] Owen, kt – 20 Feb 1529/30

To be buried in the church of the priory of Easebourne, and his body to be brought to the church with laudable ceremonies after the degree of a banneret, i.e. to be brought after the ministers of the church, with his helmet and sword, coat armour, banner, standard, pennon, and ‘setton’ [i.e. getton], a banner of the Trinity, one of Our Lady, and another of St. George, borne after the order of a man of his degree, and to be set up in the priory after the observance done over his tomb. His obit to be solemnly kept at the day of his death with placebo and dirige by note, and on the morrow three masses by note solemnly sung and said for his soul and all Christian souls, and every priest present at these services to have for his labour and prayers 12d., every clerk 4d., and child that can sing 2d., and every priest saying mass and not being present at placebo and dirige 8d. A sermon to be made at the day of his burial with [sic] a doctor of divinity, to have for his labour 10s. 0d. and further, at the discretion of his executors. Should he die from home, then to be brought to the said priory after the manner aforesaid, and every parish church that he shall come through to have 3s. 4d. in money and two torches, to be paid and delivered by his executors ; to have twelve torches continually burning about his body till he comes to the priory, and then to have [blank] staff torches about his hearse, twelve of them to be borne by twelve poor men, and the residue by his servants, the twelve poor men to have gowns and hoods at the discretion of his executors, and his servants to have for their gowns, three broad yards apiece, price per yard 3s. 4d. As many knights as come for mourners on the day of his burial shall have four and a half yards of black, price per yard 6s. 8d., to make gowns and hoods after the fashion of mourners at like burials. His children to have gowns and hoods of black cloth after their age, price per yard 6s. 8d., every other gentleman and yeoman, such as his executors shall esteem his special friends, likewise to have black gowns four yards each, price per yard 5s. 0d., to the number of fifty persons, and every knight mourner to have three servants, to have gowns, to be worn at the burial, [of] three yards, price per yard 3s. 4d. His godchildren, gentlemen’s children, to have gowns after their age, price per yard 4s. 4d., and every poor man’s child, his godchildren, gowns after their age, price per yard 3s. 4d. £40 or more to be distributed on the day of his burial at the discretion of his executors, and 3s. 4d. to the ringers at the same observance, and like observance in like manner at the month day. Four quarterly obits to be kept, the first to begin thirteen weeks after his burial; and to continue yearly and quarterly for evermore, under this manner and form, i.e. two priests of his foundation, the vicar and the said [sic] prioress’s priest, with eight conduct [i.e. hired or salaried] priests, quarterly and yearly for evermore to keep an obit with placebo and dirige by note with the said twelve priests, and mass on the morrow for the souls of King Henry VII, Henry Owen, Jasper, Duke of Bedford, his (the testator’s) father’s and mother’s souls, his wife’s and all Christian souls, to have quarterly for ever three masses by note, one of Our Lady, the Trinity, and mass of requiem, every priest having quarterly for ever for the said observance 12d., and every clerk that can sing 4d. After every quarterly observance they are to say de profundis, and none of the priests to depart until the said observance and de profundis be done. The prioress of the nuns of his said house [i.e. Easebourne] to keep a like obit quarterly and yearly for evermore the next day after the said obit kept by the four priests and eight conducts, and the prioress and her successors, being present, to have 8d. quarterly, and every nun 6d., and they to say de profundis in like manner. At the four quarterly obits, six torches to stand and be held by six poor men, each to have 4d., about the tomb during the time of the observance, and four tapers, each of 2½ lb., to stand about the tomb in like manner yearly for ever. The ringers to have quarterly 16d.

After the quarterly obit 3s. 4d. to be spent among the priests and others in meat and drink. The two priests of his foundation to have yearly for evermore six loads of wood out of his wood and park called the Single Parke, being of the inheritance of his s., Sir Harry Owen, to be lawfully assigned to them by said Sir Henry [sic], his heirs and assigns annually; and if the said two priests be interrupted, then his (the testator’s) feoffees to stand and be seised of his manor of Buddington [in the former detached tithing of Bignor, now in Easebourne] to the use of the said priests for their fuel and other necessaries to be taken of the woods and profits of the said manor. The said two priests to have yearly a ‘gowne cloth’ of 3½ broad yards, price per yard 3s. 4d., and to have his house over against the church of Easebourne, wherein his servant Edward Garton now dwells, and if it be not built by the testator, then to be built by his executors for the behoof of the priests for evermore. The said two priests to have yearly for their salary and standing wages ten marks each, five marks at Michaelmas, and five marks at Lady Day, to be paid by his feoffees out of his manors ‘herafter declared’.

Bequeaths to the said priory church [i.e. Easebourne] a suit of vestments of white damask and red, i.e. for the priest, deacon and subdeacon, with a cope of the same suit with his arms broidered upon it and altar cloths of the same to be ‘occupied’ at the mass of Our Lady, another suit of vestments of crimson velvet in like manner for the mass of the Trinity by note, and another suit of vestments of black velvet and his arms in like manner with two copes to the same of black velvet, one of tinsel satin black, ‘and ever my Armes to be Sett vpon euery of the vestmentes and Copes’, these to serve at the mass of requiem, the said copes to be made of a tinsel black satin gown which he gives to the church.

An altar of board to be made on S. side of his tomb, and another in N., and he gives to the said altar his altar cloths at home, one of white and green damask with valance of blue and red velvet purled with gold and a fringe of the same with curtains of white and green sarsenet, and hangings of green and white damask with a crucifix of Mary and John of gold, and also of green damask quarterly broidered with swallows, wolves and red roses with all their apparels, a vestment of crimson velvet with all manner of apparel belonging, and another vestment of black velvet likewise, and for every day for the same altar a vestment of tawney damask likewise.

Bequeaths to the high altar of the said church of the priory two candle-ticks of silver of the value of £10, a cross of silver and clean gilt with the images of Mary and John of the value of 40 marks, a sacring bell of silver to the value of 20s. Od., a pair of cruets of silver, parcel gilt, [of] the value of 20s. 0d., [and] a holy water stock of silver with a sprinkle of silver to the value of £10.

His executors to make a vault of brick where his body shall lie underground, and to set his tomb upon the vault in the place where it is ready appointed, and his image and that of his first wife; his tomb to be new gilt and painted, and to be set as it is ordained, the iron work about it to be ordered, fashioned and formed after that of Lord Daubeney’s tomb at Westminster, but to be of more substance. His executors to make a new stage choir at the said church of Easebourne over the old choir under such form as the nuns there may come from their dorter into the great chamber and from thence into the choir, and nobody to see them; the said choir to be made of timber after the fashion of the choir of the priory of Wyntonye [Winchester] (co. Hants), and the old choir and belfrey to be taken away, and to be used as parcel of the church with a partition to be made, so that none may come out of the church to the high altar in the chancel of the priory.

Bequeaths to the high altar of the said priory a mass book of parchment and another of paper, [and] a chalice of the value of six marks; to the altar next to his tomb on S. side a mass book of vellum and another of paper ‘prynted in paper’ and a portas of vellum to be fast chained there for every man to say service upon; and to the priory towards the reparation of the cloister 100 marks to be bestowed thereupon by the advice of his executors, and a bell to ring to mass.

His executors to gild the ceiling of the said priory church, and to furnish the same roof, to gild the angels and knots, and paint the panes with red and blue; the residue as his executors shall seem best.

Bequeaths to the parish church of Easebourne a mass book in paper, printed, with a vestment of damask, blue and red, with his arms on it, and a chalice of silver and gilt of the value of four marks with ‘letters graven on it this worde OWEN’.

Bequeaths to each of the parish churches of Midhurst, Fernhurst, Lodsworth, and Wotton [co. Surr.], a mass book of paper, printed, with a vestment of damask, blue and red, with his arms on it, and a chalice of silver and gilt to the value of four marks (altered for Midhurst and Wotton to £4), with the word ‘OWEN’ graven on it, on condition that there shall be kept by the priests of these churches once a year for evermore, an obit for the souls aforesaid, the day of his obit, to be solemnly kept, and he therefore gives to the wardens of these churches 6s. 8d. to be paid to them yearly for ever for the same obit by his feoffees of his manor of Southwick [co. Wilts.], to be distributed as the wardens seem best; and some of the most honest of these parishes to be at the said obits.

The feoffees of his manor of Wotton (co. Surr.), with the advowson and free chapel, and of all his lands in Rusper and Horsham, to stand seised thereof after his death to the use of s. Harry Owen, lawfully begotten on the body of Anne, sis. of Walter Deverrers, [3rd] Lord Ferrers of Chartley and his heirs male, and for lack of such issue these properties to remain to s. John Owen and his heirs male, and for default of such issue to his (the testator’s) second s. Jasper Owen and his heirs male, so that he will be bound to the executors never to sell any lands that he now has in possession or which he shall have through the testator’s death, and for default of such issue to remain to David Owen, s. of his (the testator’s) s. Sir Henry Owen and his heirs male, and for default of such issue to remain to the heirs of his (the testator’s) body, and for default of such issue to remain to his right heirs in fee for ever.

The feoffees of his manor of Southwick (co. Wilts.) to stand seised thereof to like uses, i.e. to the use of said s. Jasper Owen for life with remainder to his (Jasper’s) heirs male, and for default of such issue to remain to his (Jasper’s) second bro. Harry Owen and his heirs male, and for default of such issue to remain to John Owen his younger bro. and his heirs male, and for default of such issue to remain to Sir Harry Owen and his heirs male, and for default of such issue remainder to the right heirs of the testator for ever.

The receivers of his manor of Oxhulf with Chipping Dorset and Gaydon [co. Warws.] to stand seised thereof to the use of William Owen, his bastard son, and his heirs male (except the church of Oxhulf which he wills to Harry Owen, his third s. and his heirs male), and for default of such issue to remain to said Henry Owen and his heirs male, and for default of such issue remainder to the heirs male of the testator, and for default of such issue to the use of the heirs of his body.

The feoffees of his manor of Isamstede Latymer (co. Bucks.) to stand seised thereof to the use of s. John Owen lawfully begotten on the body of said Anne, and his heirs male, and for default of such issue, remainder to s. Harry Owen, ‘And for default of suche issue male’ [sic], to remain to the heirs male of the testator, and for default of such issue to his right heirs in fee for ever.

His executors to ‘fynde’ his said sons Harry Owen and John Owen, and also his said bastard son William, during their nonages with the issues and profits of the above manors and lands severally given to them, and the residue of these properties over and above their reasonable ‘fyndyng’ to be levied and gathered by his feoffees and executors, and to be laid in the chapter house of the church of Chichester, there to remain for the sure performance of his will in legacies and otherwise.

Each of his godchildren, being gentlemen’s children, to have towards marriage 13s. 4d., and every poor man’s child, being his godchild, 6s. 8d.

Should dau. Elizabeth be not married within his lifetime, then she shall have 1,000 marks and as much more as his executors shall think convenient towards her marriage, so that she be married by the advice of her mother and his executors, and if she marry without their assent then she to have but part thereof by the discretion of his executors, who shall then purchase lands and tenements with 1,000 marks to the use of s. Harry Owen, begotten of the body of said Anne, and his heirs male, and for default of such issue to remain to John Owen his (Harry’s) bro. and his heirs male, and for default of such issue to the heirs male of the testator begotten by said Anne and for default of such issue to remain to his right heirs in fee for ever.

His two said priests which shall be appointed for the foundation of his chantry shall be appointed and elected by the Dean of Chichester, the Prioress of Easebourne and the Vicar of Easebourne, for the time being, or else two of them, so that the dean be one, [who] shall at all times name and appoint when the chantry shall be void by death or otherwise, and if it happen the said priests or one of them not to be of good disposition or guiding and not doing his service, then it shall be lawful for the dean, prioress or vicar, or two of them, so that the dean be one, to expel such a priest and put in a new; and if they be of good conversation and do their service then to continue during their lives. The two priests shall weekly for evermore sing mass four days in the week with placebo and dirige for the souls of King Henry VII and all the souls before mentioned, one priest to say mass between the hours of seven and eight o’clock in the forenoon, and the other between the hours of nine and ten, and every day to sing mass there when they be disposed, and the prioress’s mass to be said between the hours of ten and eleven. The two priests to ring before they go to mass, so that every man may have knowledge thereof.

Should he have any more daughters by his said w. Anne, then every such dau. to have 500 marks towards her marriage, so that she be married by the advice of said Anne and his executors, and should they die before marriage or should he have no more daughters, then his bastard dau. to have thereof 300 marks towards her marriage, so that she be married by the advice of his executors. Should it happen [that] any other dau. of his said wife by him begotten be married and have the 500 marks, yet nevertheless his bastard dau. Barbara to have towards her marriage 300 marks, so that she be married to a gentleman of lands and by the advice of his executors.

His executors to buy a new bell for the parish church of Easebourne, to be the fifth bell, biggest of all, and the said bells to be at all times rung for his obits quarterly.

Bequeaths to w. Anne a basin and a ewer of silver of the greatest sort, three bowls of silver pounced with a cover and a wolf’s head with a ring in his mouth upon the cover, parcel gilt, a great bowl pounced with a high foot double gilt with a lion’s head with a ring in his mouth upon the cover, a great standing cup double gilt with a crown downwards, three gold goblets with a cover with his arms upon the knop of the cover ‘of the sort’, a salt of silver and double gilt with a wolf upon the cover with roses and suns and the foot a root of a tree, made of silver and gilt, two great pots of silver and gilt nigh a yard high of a gallon apiece, double gilt turned vicewise, a plain salt of silver without a cover, a dozen spoons of silver with gilt knops, a gilt spoon with a knop of gold set with a ‘saffer’, a chafing dish of silver with a wolf’s head thereupon, a cross of diamonds and three great pearls, price 100 marks, three beds of down with three bolsters of down, three featherbeds of feathers with three bolsters ‘accordyng’, three pair of fustians, eight pair of fine sheets and eight pair of sheets of another sort, a counterpoint of arras with imagery and men making wine, of silk lined with canvas, another counterpoint of ‘verder’ of silk lined with canvas, another counterpoint of ‘verders’ with a great lion in the midst of gold and silk, a trussing bed of black velvet and russet satin embroidered with wolves and swallows with O and N of gold with divers other flowers embroidered, with a tester and curtains to the same, another trussing bed of black damask and russet satin with a tester, curtains and valance to the same, five pieces of arras made with imagery of King Henry V, King Henry VI, the Duke of Clarence, the Duke of Bedford, the Duke of Gloucester, with divers other great men, a great tester of a bed with a ‘selar’ to the same of arras, with half the ‘stuffe of household’, i.e. pots, pans, dishes, spits, cauldrons, coffers, a dozen kine [and] ten great oxen for her wain, all of which he bequeaths to her ‘to be lovyng to my Children and hers’, upon condition that she live sole without marriage, and if she does marry, all the aforesaid goods to remain to his children begotten by her.

Bequeaths also to her £100; to dau. Anne Hopton a standing cup gilt like a bell, and a pot of silver; to his servant Philip Gryffith for the good service ‘that he hathe of longe tyme done vnto me’, £20.

Devises all his lands and tenements in the city of Coventry [co. Warws.] and in Watford, Farthingstone and Shotlanger (co. Northants.) to s. Jasper Owen and his heirs male, and for lack of such issue to remain to his (the testator’s) said son John Owen and his heirs male, and for lack of such issue to remain to David Owen, s. of his (the testator’s) son Sir Henry Owen, and his heirs male.

Such manors and lands as his said w. Anne has for her life for her jointure shall after her death remain to his said s. Henry Owen ‘by me of hir body begotten’, and his heirs male, and for lack of such issue to remain to said John Owen and his heirs male, and for lack of such issue to remain to David Owen, s. of his (the testator’s) son Sir Henry Owen and his heirs male, and for lack of such issue to remain to his (the testator’s) son Jasper Owen and his heirs male, and for lack of such issue to remain to the right heirs of the testator for ever.

Devises all his land in Wold [Old] (co. Northants.) and in Bosworth and Dunton (co. Leics.) to said s. Jasper Owen and his heirs male, and for lack of such issue to remain to his (Jasper’s) bro. Henry Owen the younger and his heirs male, and for lack of such issue to remain to the heirs male of the testator, and for lack of such issue to remain to his right heirs.

Bequeaths to his loving friend William Huxley, serjeant at arms, £6 13s. 4d.; and to the chapter house of the church of Chichester for an obit to be kept yearly there for five years next after his (the testator’s) death, and for safekeeping of such ‘stuffe’ and money and all other things which shall be left by him or by his executors in the custody of the same ‘houses’, 20 marks and further as shall be thought by the discretion of his executors.

Appoints Robert Norwiche, the king’s serjeant at law, Roger Denys, gent., and Sir William Fitzwilliam, kt., treasurer of the king’s household, as executors, and for their labour and pain, bequeaths to said Robert Norwiche £100 and to said Roger Denys £40. Appoints Thomas, [8th] Duke of Norfolk as one of the supervisors of his will, bequeathing to him for his labour and pain 100 marks, and [John, 15th] Earl of Oxford as another supervisor, bequeathing to him for his labour £40.

Bequeaths to Walter Williams, his servant, if dwelling with him at the time of his death, 4 marks for his year’s wages, and to every other servant in household with him at the time of his death, a whole year’s wages. In the additional clause, he appoints Thomas Audeley, kt., lord chancellor of England as executor in place of Robert Norwiche, kt., late Chief Justice of the Common Pleas, now decd.

Printed, with some notes on Sir David Owen, and indicating variations between the above draft and the registered copy of the will [P.C.C. 6 Spert], by W. H. Blaauw, Sussex Archaeological Collections, vol. 7, pp. 22-43. The registered copy has been printed by W. H. St. John Hope, Cowdray and Easebourne Priory, pp. 111-118, indicating variations in this draft. A few extracts were printed by N. H. Nicolas, Testamenta Vetusta, vol. 2, pp. 700-702

Advertisements